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Strategic Plans

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June 4, 2014 | 12:45 pm
All of the reports, articles, books, and other resources referenced on the Global Teacher Education Website can be found here.  All references are listed alphabetically.  To recommend a reference, contact us, email us, or upload a reference to our site (you do not need to include an attachment or document, just a reference will suffice).Books and Book ChaptersAnzaldúa, Gloria E. (1987). Borderlands/La Frontera: The new metiza.  San Francisco, CA:  Spinters/Aunt Lute Books.Sen, Amartya. (1999). Development as freedom.  New York: Anchor Books.Cushner, Kenneth & Brennan, Sharon. (2007). Intercultural Student Teaching:  A Bridge to Global Competence.  Lanham, MD:  Rowman & Littlefield Education.Goodwin, A. Lin & Oyler, Celia.  (2008).  "Teacher Educators at Gatekeepers:  Deciding who is ready to teach."  In Handbook of Research in Teacher Education:  Enduring Questions in Changing Contexts, third edition.  Cochran-Smith, Marilyn; Feiman-Nemser, Sharon; McIntyre, D. John.;... read more
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June 26, 2013 | 6:48 pm
Indiana University (IU) has a long history of embracing internationalization in its School of Education.  When W. W. Wright became the second dean of the college in 1946, he expressed a clear commitment to global engagement that is even more apparent today under the leadership of Dean Gerardo Gonzalez. “Globally competent pedagogy and preparing globally competent teachers through research, theory, and best practices is integral to our mission,” notes Gonzalez.  “It is the fabric of our program.”   Campus Wide Foundation of SupportAs an institution, IU is dedicated to internationalization.  The University’s core curriculum includes a six-credit hour world languages and cultures requirement, which may be fulfilled by taking courses in world cultures or languages or through an international experience – such as study abroad – for at least six weeks.  As a required element of a students’ overall course load, the requirement shows that the institution is committed to ensuring all of their... read more
Posted by: Caitlin Haugen
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June 7, 2013 | 1:07 pm
In a political and economic climate with competing priroties, administrators are often required to make a case for internationalization.  Through its Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement (CIGE), the American Council on Education provides a wealth of information on internationalizing at the campus level, including on making a case for internationalization.  The Center provides variety of resources and examples, which can guide this work in colleges of education. Internationalization is an important priority for colleges of education in the US. Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth to Engage the World, a report produced by the Council of Chief State School Officers and the Asia Society Partnership for Global Learning, argues that youth are called on “to live, compete, and collaborate in a new global scenario.” This includes “unprecedented global migration and the changing nature of neighborhoods, identities, and citizenship” and “the flattened global... read more
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February 28, 2013 | 12:34 pm
Internationalization efforts in colleges of education can often be the result of internationalization at the campus level - either in cooporation of or as a directive from a president or provost who understands the importance of the process.  The Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement at the American Council on Education has been supporting campus-wide internationalization efforts for over a decade.  The Center offers an Internationalization Laboratory where campuses are guided through a two year process to help identify an internationalization team, poinpoint current internationalization efforts, and develop a strategic plan.  It also offers an Institute for Leading Internationalization for senior campus leaders responsible for internationalization.Several institutions have taken a campus-wide approach to internationalization.  Miami University in Oxford, Ohio restructured its general education requirements and instituted the “Global Miami Plan” that requires all... read more
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February 28, 2013 | 11:58 am
Teacher educators must share in the vital role of instructing future educators to teach the next generation about global issues.  There is obviously a special role for education faculty in this process, but faculty in other disciplines are also essential to developing the international knowledge, skills, and attitudes of teacher candidates. At most institutions, general education courses represent an estimated 50% to 75% of a teacher candidate’s coursework. In the Handbook of Research on Teacher Education: Enduring Questions in Changing Contexts, A. Lin Goodwin and Celia Oyler note, “[H]istorically, general education requirements or ‘academic’ courses consume the majority of credits (as much as 75%) required for elementary or secondary teacher certification, and reform in university-based teacher preparation curricula over the past 50 years has consistently resulted in more academic courses and fewer education courses … and these academic courses are offered by Arts and Sciences... read more
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February 18, 2013 | 8:53 am
According to Mary Lynne Calhoun, former Dean of the College of Education at The University of North Carolina, Charlotte, “Professors and students need a road map – a way to get started.”  A College of Education Internationalization Plan, designed and approved by the faculty, provides exactly the kind of roadmap that guides the student experience and faculty development within the college.Emphasis on Global PerspectivesUNC Charlotte has a uniquely successful approach to accomplishing its global perspectives emphasis. It begins before students ever spend a day in the teacher education program. The university requires two years of foreign language study to qualify for their teacher education program, ensuring that students have at minimum, moderate exposure to another language prior to beginning their studies.  Once students have been accepted to the college, they begin cultivating global perspectives from their earliest experiences in the program. The coursework sequence requires a... read more
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November 26, 2012 | 12:15 pm
Here is a quick summary of elements to consider when internationalizing teacher preparation programs.  This section of the website explores many different aspects of internationalization in teacher preparation.When revising teacher preparation programs, ensure that:General education coursework helps each prospective teachers develop deep knowledge of at least one world region, culture, or global issue, and facility in one language in addition to English. Professional education courses teach the pedagogical skills to enable future teachers to teach the global dimensions of their subject matter. GTE offers information by subject, including English language arts, mathematics, physical education and health, science, social studies, and visual and performing arts.International and domestic field experiences support the development of pre-service teachers’ global perspectives. There are incentives, not barriers, to faculty at all levels engaging in this work. All work aligns to the global... read more
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November 26, 2012 | 12:01 pm
There is no denying that charismatic leaders and “lighthouse” projects can have major impact in achieving goals like internationalization. These efforts, however, are often limited and short-lived, missing the chance to have lasting and deep influence in effecting organizational reform in educator preparation. Many colleges have positive initiatives that strive to implement broad goals related to internationalization, but true internationalization is systematic and requires holistic transformation of everything from curriculum to faculty and staff attitudes to funding structures.​True internationalization, according to the report Internationalizing the Campus: A User’s Guide from the American Council on Education (ACE), is not an easy or quick process – requiring one global requirement or adding international content to existing courses will not suffice.  Successful internationalization, “requires making the case to multiple stakeholders and tapping external interest… [it] is a slow,... read more